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Whistler Backcountry Avalanche Advisory

Issued: Tuesday February 25, 2020 4:00pm

Avalanche Summary

Minimal avalanche activity observed Tuesday.

Reports from Monday include a natural wind slab avalanche cycle to size 2, as well as skier controlled, accidental and remotely triggered storm slabs size 1-2 on northeast aspects in the alpine and upper treeline. This MIN post includes a photo of a skier triggered wind slab.

Snowpack Summary

20-40 cm of settling snow sits over old surfaces consisting of surface facets, isolated patched of surface hoar in sheltered areas or sun crusts on solar aspects. Wind affect in the alpine is extremely variable, with reports ranging from minimal soft slab development to wind scoured surfaces and hard slabs. Soft snow is well preserved on sheltered shady aspects.

Faceted snow and crusts exist near the base of the snowpack in much of the region. This layer is believed to be largely dormant at the moment.

Weather Forecast

Tuesday night: A trace of snow. Light to moderate west wind. Freezing level 900 m.

Wednesday: A trace of snow. Light to moderate southwest wind. Freezing level 1300 m.

Thursday: 5-10 cm new snow. Moderate west wind. Freezing level 1400 m.

Friday: Mostly cloudy. Light southwest wind. Freezing level 1500 m.

Advisory for Thursday:
Advisory 3-Day Overview:
 
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Alpine
Moderate
Moderate
Moderate
Treeline
Moderate
Moderate
Moderate
Below Treeline
Low
Low
Low
 
Thursday
Alpine
Moderate
Treeline
Moderate
Below Treeline
Low

 
Friday
Alpine
Moderate
Treeline
Moderate
Below Treeline
Low

 
Saturday
Alpine
Moderate
Treeline
Moderate
Below Treeline
Low


Current Dangers

Storm Slab

20-40 cm of settling snow sits over old surfaces consisting of surface facets, isolated patched of surface hoar in sheltered areas or sun crusts on solar aspects. Where wind has aided slab development, natural, human triggered and even remotely triggered avalanches have been observed on this layer. Slabs will be deepest where wind has loaded lee terrain features in alpine and exposed treeline areas.

What Elevations?

What Aspects?

Chances of Avalanche?

Expected Size?




Forecast provided by Avalanche Canada.

Wayne Flann's Blog
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